Upper Peninsula Regional Labor Federation


The #MeToo movement has challenged our nation to confront pervasive sexual harassment in the workplace.

The Donald Trump Labor Department is proposing a rule change that would mean that restaurant servers and bartenders could lose a large portion of their earnings.

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small group of special interests are threatening our lawmakers if they don’t take steps to slash pay for skilled construction workers by eliminating prevailing wage laws. Michigan lost many skilled trades workers during the last recession and these workers are just starting to get back on their feet.

Common-sense prevailing wage policies mean that the state will have a more skilled and educated workforce, as well as safer local construction jobs for Michigan men and women. Michigan Prevails supports those Michigan construction companies and workers who help keep the state and economy running.

You can make a difference. Send a letter telling your Representative to support Michigan workers by supporting Michigan’s Prevailing Wage law.

Unions help build a better life for working people but the wealthy are trying to further rig the economic system in their favor. Show your support for unions.

Recent News

 The 25th U.P. Labor Education Conference “Bridging Generations of Labor” will be on September 16 & 17, 2016 at the Don H. Bottum University Center on the Northern Michigan University campus in Marquette, MI. Featured presenters include Elizabeth Shuler, Secretary Treasurer, National AFL-CIO. Early Registration Deadline is September 9, 2016.  

Nearly two centuries ago, a group of women and girls—some as young as 12—decided they'd had enough. Laboring in the textile mills of Lowell, Massachusetts, they faced exhausting 14-hour days, abusive supervisors and dangerous working conditions. When threatened with a pay cut, they finally put their foot down.

The mill workers organized, went on strike and formed America's first union of working women. They shocked their bosses, captured the attention of a young nation and blazed a trail for the nascent labor movement that would follow.

Members and leaders of the union that represents hotel and hospitality workers gathered Monday evening to discuss the workers’ experiences with sexual harassment by guests and what the union is doing to create safer workplaces for its members.

The meeting of national and local leaders of the AFL-CIO, Chicago Federation of Labor and employees that the union represents — which includes hotel and hospitality workers — came less than a month after an alderman sponsored a loophole into the city’s sexual harassment ordinance that would weaken the legislation.

The Senate will vote on a bill Tuesday that’s being touted by supporters as much-needed regulatory relief for small community banks — a sales pitch that conjures images of tellers greeting longtime customers by name as they kick farm dust off their boots at the door.