News

On Feb. 15, just days after massive layoffs at Activision Blizzard, the AFL-CIO issued a powerful public statement of support to game developers in the United States. Its message, published in an open letter at Kotaku, was both simple and profound.

Last year, in communities all across the country, millions of Americans mobilized and called for an economy that works for all of us.

More workers were involved in strikes and other labor disputes in 2018 than at any point in the past three decades, fueled by widespread teacher protests last spring, according to data releas

Below are the Upper Peninsula Regional Labor Federation's endorsements in upcoming races. The general election is Tuesday, November 6.

STATEWIDE OFFICE

  • Governor & Lt. Gov: Gretchen Whitmer & Garlin Gilchrist (D)
  • Secretary of State: Jocelyn Benson (D)
  • Attorney General: Dana Nessel (D)

FEDERAL OFFICE

  • US Senator: Debbie Stabenow (D)
  • US House, DIstrict 1: Matt Morgan (D)

STATE LEGISLATURE

  • State Senate, District 38: Scott Dianda (D)
  • State House, District 107: Joanne Galloway (D)
  • State House, District 108: Bob Romps (D)
  • State House, District 109: Sara Cambensy (D)
  • State House, District 110: Ken Summers (D)

STATE BOARDS

  • State Board of Ed: Judy Pritchett and Tiffany Tilley
  • U of M Regents: Jordan Acker and Paul Brown
  • MSU Trustees: Brianna Scott and Kelly Tebay
  • Wayne State Governors: Bryan Barnhill and Dr. Anil Kumar

STATE SUPREME COURT

  • Sam Bagenstos
  • Megan Cavanagh

STATE BALLOT MEASURES

  • YES on Prop 2 to end partisan gerrymandering
  • YES on Prop 3 to protect voting rights and make our elections more secure

DELTA COUNTY 

  • Bay Community College Board of Trustees: Bill Milligan

DICKINSON COUNTY

  • Board of Commissioners, District 4: Geno Alessandrini, Jr.

MARQUETTE COUNTY

  • Marquette City Commission: Jenna Smith
  • Marquette City Commission: Jenn Hill
  • Negaunee City Council: Edward Karki
  • Marquette Area Public Schools, School Board: Brandon Canfield
  • Marquette Area Public Schools, School Board: Erich Ottem

As the tax deadline looms and millions scurry to get their forms sent on time, Tax Day is a good time to dispel the myth that the U.S. Postal Service is funded by tax dollars.

At an industry conference for video game developers in late March, the thousands of lanyarded attendees could try new games, swap business cards and hear from experts on rendering realistic blood spatter.

Or they could talk about unionizing.

Hundreds joined a series of standing-room-only roundtables on the topic of organized labor, taking time away from the Game Developers Conference to brainstorm ways to build worker power in an industry that is almost entirely nonunion.

Taxpayers are scrambling to make last-minute payments due to the Internal Revenue Service in just four days, but many of the country’s largest publicly-held corporations are doing better: They’ve reported they owe absolutely nothing on the billions of dollars in profits they earned last year.

In 2018, women once again came home with over 16% less money in their paychecks. Tuesday is Equal Pay Day, which means women had to work until April 2—92 days longer—to be paid the same amount as a comparable man in 2018.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi suggested Tuesday that President Trump must reopen talks with Canada and Mexico to tighten enforcement provisions in a proposed North American trade deal, casting renewed doubt on prospects for congressional ratification of the accord.

“I’m not anti-union, but I don’t really think we need them, right?” said Double Fine head Tim Schafer while hosting yesterday evening’s Game Developers Choice Awards in San Francisco. “We’re all great here and in this show. No one here is union and...” Then the stage lights went out.

“Oh, right,” said Schafer after the lights went out. “Except for the lighting crew. I forgot they’re all union.”

A four-year fight to expand overtime pay to millions of workers may soon be over. About 1.2 million workers will win and 2.8 million will lose.

The Department of Labor is scaling back an Obama-era rule that would have doubled the maximum salary for a worker to qualify for overtime pay, according to a proposed rule the agency sent to the Office of the Federal Register for public review.