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Last year, in communities all across the country, millions of Americans mobilized and called for an economy that works for all of us.

More workers were involved in strikes and other labor disputes in 2018 than at any point in the past three decades, fueled by widespread teacher protests last spring, according to data releas

Gebre was still a boy when he was forced to flee Ethiopia, a country that suffered political turmoil and famine during the 1980s.

Below are the Upper Peninsula Regional Labor Federation's endorsements in upcoming races. The general election is Tuesday, November 6.

STATEWIDE OFFICE

  • Governor & Lt. Gov: Gretchen Whitmer & Garlin Gilchrist (D)
  • Secretary of State: Jocelyn Benson (D)
  • Attorney General: Dana Nessel (D)

FEDERAL OFFICE

  • US Senator: Debbie Stabenow (D)
  • US House, DIstrict 1: Matt Morgan (D)

STATE LEGISLATURE

  • State Senate, District 38: Scott Dianda (D)
  • State House, District 107: Joanne Galloway (D)
  • State House, District 108: Bob Romps (D)
  • State House, District 109: Sara Cambensy (D)
  • State House, District 110: Ken Summers (D)

STATE BOARDS

  • State Board of Ed: Judy Pritchett and Tiffany Tilley
  • U of M Regents: Jordan Acker and Paul Brown
  • MSU Trustees: Brianna Scott and Kelly Tebay
  • Wayne State Governors: Bryan Barnhill and Dr. Anil Kumar

STATE SUPREME COURT

  • Sam Bagenstos
  • Megan Cavanagh

STATE BALLOT MEASURES

  • YES on Prop 2 to end partisan gerrymandering
  • YES on Prop 3 to protect voting rights and make our elections more secure

DELTA COUNTY 

  • Bay Community College Board of Trustees: Bill Milligan

DICKINSON COUNTY

  • Board of Commissioners, District 4: Geno Alessandrini, Jr.

MARQUETTE COUNTY

  • Marquette City Commission: Jenna Smith
  • Marquette City Commission: Jenn Hill
  • Negaunee City Council: Edward Karki
  • Marquette Area Public Schools, School Board: Brandon Canfield
  • Marquette Area Public Schools, School Board: Erich Ottem

If an investor was searching for the country’s most explosively successful commodity, they might look to the ground for natural resources or to Wall Street for some new financial instrument. But, the most meteoric success story can be found virtually all around us—in the booming video game industry. Growing by double digits, U.S. video game sales reached $43 billion in 2018, about 3.6 times greater than the film industry’s record-breaking box office.

I understand why it would be insane to spend even a day without controllers, troops, Transportation Security Administration screeners, Coast Guard officers, FBI and Border Patrol agents and a laundry list of other truly essential workers employed by the federal government. What I don’t understand is why we tolerate a system that lets elected officials fail to do their one real job — funding the government — with no consequences for anyone in power.

Something funny happened on the way to the labor movement’s funeral.

The longest government shutdown in American history is over for now. On Friday afternoon, Donald Trump announced a deal to reopen government for the next three weeks. The short-term appropriations measure notably includes no funding for his beloved border wall — or steel slat fence, or smart wall, or whatever else he decides to call it in the future.

When women and our allies unite, we build power. That’s true in mass marches and on the job.

“I never realized how strongly unionizing and feminism go together,” registered nurse (RN) Suzanne Levitch, 33, of Johns Hopkins Hospital, in Baltimore, tells Teen Vogue. “There’s not really another way for workers, especially women workers, to be treated fairly.”

The nation’s airlines are blaming the partial federal government shutdown for putting another dark cloud in their path, with few federal workers and contractors taking to the skies and stalled federal agency approvals causing delays in expansion plans, including Southwest Airlines’ much-anticipated service to Hawaii.

The focus of General Motors’ November announcement shutting down plants in Lordstown, Ohio; Hamtramck and Warren, Michigan; and Baltimore, Maryland shouldn’t be about money. It should be about people.

UAW GM members are dedicated and committed to making a great product, supporting the success of a company, and supporting a solid, prosperous community.

Unfortunately, that’s not how it's playing out. UAW GM members are facing the disruption of their families.