News

Despite its setbacks, or perhaps because of them, organized labor has an energy level that AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka says he hasn’t seen before in his 50 years with the movement.

On May 7, while recovering from an illness, Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) International President Larry Hanley died suddenly.  In a brief statement, his family,

Patt Moon-Updike wanted to be a nurse since she was 9 years old.

Below are the Upper Peninsula Regional Labor Federation's endorsements in upcoming races. The general election is Tuesday, November 6.

STATEWIDE OFFICE

  • Governor & Lt. Gov: Gretchen Whitmer & Garlin Gilchrist (D)
  • Secretary of State: Jocelyn Benson (D)
  • Attorney General: Dana Nessel (D)

FEDERAL OFFICE

  • US Senator: Debbie Stabenow (D)
  • US House, DIstrict 1: Matt Morgan (D)

STATE LEGISLATURE

  • State Senate, District 38: Scott Dianda (D)
  • State House, District 107: Joanne Galloway (D)
  • State House, District 108: Bob Romps (D)
  • State House, District 109: Sara Cambensy (D)
  • State House, District 110: Ken Summers (D)

STATE BOARDS

  • State Board of Ed: Judy Pritchett and Tiffany Tilley
  • U of M Regents: Jordan Acker and Paul Brown
  • MSU Trustees: Brianna Scott and Kelly Tebay
  • Wayne State Governors: Bryan Barnhill and Dr. Anil Kumar

STATE SUPREME COURT

  • Sam Bagenstos
  • Megan Cavanagh

STATE BALLOT MEASURES

  • YES on Prop 2 to end partisan gerrymandering
  • YES on Prop 3 to protect voting rights and make our elections more secure

DELTA COUNTY 

  • Bay Community College Board of Trustees: Bill Milligan

DICKINSON COUNTY

  • Board of Commissioners, District 4: Geno Alessandrini, Jr.

MARQUETTE COUNTY

  • Marquette City Commission: Jenna Smith
  • Marquette City Commission: Jenn Hill
  • Negaunee City Council: Edward Karki
  • Marquette Area Public Schools, School Board: Brandon Canfield
  • Marquette Area Public Schools, School Board: Erich Ottem

Federal agencies have been told to carry out Trump administration directives aimed at restricting the role of unions in the federal workplace and giving agencies the maximum discretion in taking disciplinary actions against employees, now that a court ban against many of those policies has been lifted.

A key labor leader has warned House Democrats not to expedite approval of a new North American trade deal, saying that the agreement remains far from complete and that a vote in coming weeks would be a “colossal mistake.”

It was just a decade ago that the Great Recession — the worst economic disaster since the Great Depression — upended life for hundreds of millions of Americans. More than 8 million people across the country lost their jobs. Millions more lost their homes and life savings.

The economy has made steady improvements since 2008, but recovery has disproportionately favored wealthier Americans.

One of the workshops at the Connecticut AFL-CIO’s two-day convention that opened here Thursday explored the lessons offered from “worker power resurgence,” a reference to labor’s extraordinary year of strikes and other work stoppages in 2018.

For decades, working families could depend on labor unions to represent their collective interests -- ensuring a living wage, better benefits and a voice in their workplace. Now, after 50 years of rollbacks on union and labor rights, workers have been silenced at their jobs. The Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act is an opportunity for Congress to give working families their voice back.

A decade ago, General Motors was on the verge of collapse. Facing down an earth-shattering financial crisis, tens of thousands of UAW members agreed to help save an American icon — and the economy along with it.

Autoworkers took on personal financial sacrifices, conceding contract victories that had taken years to secure. Working harder and longer for less, they ultimately carried GM out of bankruptcy and into a period of record-breaking profits.

When about 48,000 workers went on strike Monday against General Motors, they launched the largest American labor stoppage against any business since the financial crisis.